The Guardian: ‘Sometimes it’s hard to remember what life as a Muslim was like before 9/11’

Sometimes it’s hard to remember what life as a non-Muslim was like without the omnipresent and growing threat of jihad and Sharia encroachment, but the establishment media has no interest in discussing that.

“Sometimes it’s hard to remember what life as a Muslim was like before 9/11,” by Nesrine Malik, Guardian, September 13, 2021 (thanks to Henry):

I try to remember what it was like to be a Muslim before 9/11. It is hard. It gets harder every year. I think I remember that being a Muslim didn’t mean much to others, and was mostly a private identity, one that different people wore in different ways.

I feel as if, before, there was a time when a Muslim was a much more complicated, much roomier thing to be – inflected with local culture and individual circumstances. Today, you can only be a good Muslim or a bad one. Either a “moderate” or a “radical”. Either a Muslim who needs to be saved or a Muslim you need to be saved from.

There was also a time when we could fight and resolve our issues as Muslims, whatever that categorisation meant at any given point, without the west gawping, judging us as messed up individuals or societies. On 9/11, many of us became distracted from that inner work, and lined up against a more urgent external, retributive threat. We couldn’t focus on keeping our own house in order because it was on fire, or about to be.

When I try to remember what it was like before, what I am really doing is attempting to piece together when Islam went from being a multidimensional, personal identity to a flat, political one, and 9/11 feels like the day it happened….

You might also like
Leave A Reply

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More