On 9/11, there were 1,200 mosques in the U.S. Now there are nearly 3,000.

This rise shows that contrary to the thrust of this Slate article, Muslims for the most part have no trouble building mosques in the U.S. Also, the rise in the number of mosques reflects the rise in the number of Muslims in the country. If the U.S. is so “Islamophobic” and paranoid after 9/11 as the establishment media would have you believe, why this increase?

“The Mosque Wars,” by Aymann Ismail, Slate, September 11, 2021 (thanks to Henry):

Ossama Bahloul, an imam and religious scholar, moved to Tennessee in 2008, at a time when more Muslims were settling there than ever before. In a phone conversation recently, he could barely contain his enthusiasm for the state, extolling the “very loving” community and the beauty of the Smoky Mountains.

His sweetness belied much of what he spent our call telling me. Over the past decade, he said, his mosque has repeatedly been vandalized and spray-painted with obscenities like “Fuck Allah.” Raw bacon was left on the mosque’s doorstep, and again on the front door’s handle, a strange but persistent tactic of anti-Muslim bigots. Once, Bahloul said, the security camera caught a group of men attempting to destroy the mosque by arson.

This all began in earnest around 2010, when his thriving community sought to do what had become the most radioactive thing an American Muslim could do post-9/11: build a new mosque.

On 9/11, there were only about 1,200 mosques across the U.S. That would rise to nearly 3,000 by last year.

American Muslims lived with dueling realities in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks. They faced surging hate crimes and vast, illegal surveillance from their own government, leading to contemporary surveys that showed the majority viewed the U.S. as hostile to them. At the same time, their communities and civic life expanded at a rapid pace. The American Muslim population is now nearing 4 million, roughly twice the size it was on 9/11. And with that came a need for more mosques.

On 9/11, there were only about 1,200 mosques across the U.S. That would nearly double by 2010, and rise to nearly 3,000 by last year….

You might also like
Leave A Reply

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More